knoxville


WELCOME TO KNOXVILLE


KNOXVILLE CIVIL WAR TRAIL
 
       

About Knoxville

Surrounding Towns

Trip Ideas

Climate

Geography

Knoxville Government

Knoxville Accessibility

Recreation Resources

Knoxville Demographics

Knoxville Facts

Melting Pot

Going to School in Knoxville

School Website

Wallpaper

Contact

Order your Knoxville Planning Guide here.



 

The Knoxville Civil War Trail begins at Fort Dickerson on Chapman Highway, continues through the Fort Sanders area and concludes in Farragut, TN.


Fort Dickerson
By late in 1863, the Union army had turned Knoxville into one of the most fortified cities in the country. Chief Engineer Capt. (later Gen.) Orlando M. Poe used civilians and slaves to assist his 300-man engineering battalion, while Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside marched south to block Confederate Gen. James Longstreet’s approach. On returning, Burnside’s men joined in the digging and surrounded the city with 16 forts and batteries, miles of earthworks, and two dams to flood the area just north of Knoxville.
3000 Fort Dickerson Rd., Chapman Hwy, Knoxville, TN 37919 • Map It

Fort Sanders
In mid-November 1863, Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside’s army was frantically digging earthworks to defend Knoxville from the approaching Confederate army under Gen. James Longstreet. This ridge overlooked the route of the Confederate advance along Kingston Road. The Confederates had begun a fortification named Fort Loudon before evacuating the city the previous August.
Redeemer Church of Knoxville, 1642 Highland Ave., Knoxville, TN 37916 • Map It

Old Gray Cemetery
Since the Civil War, the thirteen-acre Old Gray Cemetery has been the final resting place for Union and Confederate veterans. During the conflict, control of Knoxville shifted from Confederate to Union forces, so it is appropriate that both sides are represented here. The cemetery was established in 1850 and reflects the Rural Cemetery Movement that swept the urban South in the decade before the war. There are no political divisions within Old Gray. Tennessee’s Reconstruction era governor William G. “Parson” Brownlow (1805–77) lies buried just across the way from Henry M. Ashby (1836–68), one of the Confederacy’s youngest colonels.
Corner of 17th Street and Highland Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37916 • Map It

Bleak House
Bleak House, the home of Robert Houston Armstrong and Louisa Franklin Armstrong, is an Italianate-style mansion completed in 1858. During the Siege and Battle of Knoxville, November 17–December 4, 1863, the house was Confederate Gen. James Longstreet’s headquarters. A sharpshooter unit, “The Elite Twenty,” occupied the house’s second-floor east-facing windows, as well as the tower. They were armed with British Whitworth rifles, accurate to about 1,500 yards.
3148 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919 • Map It

Campbell’s Station
The fighting along the Kingston Turnpike in front of you here at Campbell’s Station on a cold, rainy, and miserable November 16, 1863, helped to set the stage for the decisive Battle of Knoxville. Confederate Gen. James Longstreet’s corps had been moving north from Chattanooga to recapture Knoxville from Union Gen. Ambrose Burnside and establish a base in East Tennessee. Knoxville was a vital strongpoint for both armies because it was where supplies for the Confederacy arrived by rail from Virginia.
11408 Municipal Center Dr, Farragut, TN 37934 • Map It


Source: www.tn.gov


 

WELCOME TO KNOXVILLE
Home
About
Trip Ideas
Climate
Geography
Knoxville Government
Knoxville Accessibility
Recreation Resources
Knoxville Facts
Going to School
Student Website
Melting Pot
Wallpaper
E-Cards
Contact

WHERE TO EAT
Restaurants
Farmers' Markets
Tasty Itineraries
Recipe Cards



  4 SEASONS
Winter Itineraries
Spring Itineraries
Summer Fun
Fall/Harvest

LOCAL TOOLS
Welcome
Government
Education
Real Estate
Health & Medical
Religious
Libraries
Organizations & Associations
Social Services
Downtown Knoxville
News & Weather
Media
Demographics
Transportation
Science & Technology
History
Knoxville Legal
Knoxville Business
Employment
Cemeteries
Order Your Free Visitor's Guide
  WHERE TO STAY
Lodging
Camping
Weekend Getaways
Family Vacations
Romantic Escapes

BUSINESS
Doing Business in Knoxville
Knoxville Business District
Demographics
Knoxville Finance District
Employment
Major Employers
Major Manufacturers
Employers Headquartered in Knoxville

RELOCATION
Relocation Packet
Real Estate
Temporary Housing

  WHAT TO DO
Attractions
Lakes, Beaches and Water Fun
Outdoor Adventure
Scenic Drives and Rides
Sports
Shopping
Spas & Well Being
Heritage, History, & Culture
Nature Activities
Arts & Entertainment
Markets & Fairs

VENUES
Meetings
Weddings
Entertainment


© 1996-2018 by Image Builders | Privacy Policy
knoxville visitor guide knoxville news knoxville twitter knoxville facebook knoxville business knoxville venues welcome knoxville facts 4 seasons local information what to do knoxville knoxville restaurants accommodations knoxville tn